3 Contoh Dongeng Populer 2016 Dalam Bahasa Inggris
3 Contoh Dongeng Populer 2016 Dalam Bahasa Inggris

3 Contoh Dongeng Populer 2016 Dalam Bahasa Inggris

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3 Contoh Dongeng Populer 2016 Dalam Bahasa Inggris


3 Contoh Dongeng Populer 2016 Dalam Bahasa Inggris
3 Contoh Dongeng Populer 2016 Dalam Bahasa Inggris


Dalam bahasa inggris maupun dalam bahasa indonesia, dikenal adanya dongeng. Dongeng merupakan sebuah cerita yang kebanaranya tidak dapat di pertanggung jawabkan, begitu juga dengan sumber nya. Dalam bahasa inggris dan bahasa indonesia, banyak sekali dongeng atau cerita-cerita dan salah satunya adalah yang akan admin contohkan pada kesempatan berikut ini.

Berikut ini 3 contoh dongeng populer dalam bahasa inggristahun 2016 yang dapat sahabat KBI jadikan sebagai referensi belajar bahasa inggris, so, check this out 🙂

Little Red Riding Hood
Little Red Riding Hood


Once upon a time, there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest.  Whenever she went out, the little girl wore a red riding cloak, so everyone in the village called her Little Red Riding Hood.

One morning, Little Red Riding Hood asked her mother if she could go to visit her grandmother as it had been awhile since they’d seen each other.

“That’s a good idea,” her mother said.  So they packed a nice basket for Little Red Riding Hood to take to her grandmother.

When the basket was ready, the little girl put on her red cloak and kissed her mother goodbye.

“Remember, go straight to Grandma’s house,” her mother cautioned.  “Don’t dawdle along the way and please don’t talk to strangers!  The woods are dangerous.”

“Don’t worry, mommy,” said Little Red Riding Hood, “I’ll be careful.”

But when Little Red Riding Hood noticed some lovely flowers in the woods, she forgot her promise to her mother.  She picked a few, watched the butterflies flit about for awhile, listened to the frogs croaking and then picked a few more.

Little Red Riding Hood was enjoying the warm summer day so much, that she didn’t notice a dark shadow approaching out of the forest behind her…

Suddenly, the wolf appeared beside her.

“What are you doing out here, little girl?” the wolf asked in a voice as friendly as he could muster.

“I’m on my way to see my Grandma who lives through the forest, near the brook,”  Little Red Riding Hood replied.

Then she realized how late she was and quickly excused herself, rushing down the path to her Grandma’s house.

The wolf, in the meantime, took a shortcut…

The wolf, a little out of breath from running, arrived at Grandma’s and knocked lightly at the door.

“Oh thank goodness dear!  Come in, come in!  I was worried sick that something had happened to you in the forest,” said Grandma thinking that the knock was her granddaughter.

The wolf let himself in.  Poor Granny did not have time to say another word, before the wolf gobbled her up!

The wolf let out a satisfied burp, and then poked through Granny’s wardrobe to find a nightgown that he liked.  He added a frilly sleeping cap, and for good measure, dabbed some of Granny’s perfume behind his pointy ears.

A few minutes later, Red Riding Hood knocked on the door.  The wolf jumped into bed and pulled the covers over his nose.  “Who is it?” he called in a cackly voice.

“It’s me, Little Red Riding Hood.”

“Oh how lovely!  Do come in, my dear,” croaked the wolf.

When Little Red Riding Hood entered the little cottage, she could scarcely recognize her Grandmother.

“Grandmother!  Your voice sounds so odd.  Is something the matter?” she asked.

“Oh, I just have touch of a cold,” squeaked the wolf adding a cough at the end to prove the point.

“But Grandmother!  What big ears you have,” said Little Red Riding Hood as she edged closer to the bed.

“The better to hear you with, my dear,” replied the wolf.

“But Grandmother!  What big eyes you have,” said Little Red Riding Hood.

“The better to see you with, my dear,” replied the wolf.

“But Grandmother!  What big teeth you have,” said Little Red Riding Hood her voice quivering slightly.

“The better to eat you with, my dear,” roared the wolf and he leapt out of the bed and began to chase the little girl.

Almost too late, Little Red Riding Hood realized that the person in the bed was not her Grandmother, but a hungry wolf.

She ran across the room and through the door, shouting, “Help!  Wolf!” as loudly as she could.

A woodsman who was chopping logs nearby heard her cry and ran towards the cottage as fast as he could.

He grabbed the wolf and made him spit out the poor Grandmother who was a bit frazzled by the whole experience, but still in one piece.“Oh Grandma, I was so scared!”  sobbed Little Red Riding Hood, “I’ll never speak to strangers or dawdle in the forest again.”

“There, there, child.  You’ve learned an important lesson.  Thank goodness you shouted loud enough for this kind woodsman to hear you!”

The woodsman knocked out the wolf and carried him deep into the forest where he wouldn’t bother people any longer.

Little Red Riding Hood and her Grandmother had a nice lunch and a long chat.

The Story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears
The Story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears

Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Goldilocks.  She  went for a walk in the forest.  Pretty soon, she came upon a house.  She knocked and, when no one answered, she walked right in.

At the table in the kitchen, there were three bowls of porridge.  Goldilocks was hungry.  She tasted the porridge from the first bowl.

“This porridge is too hot!” she exclaimed.

So, she tasted the porridge from the second bowl.

“This porridge is too cold,” she said

So, she tasted the last bowl of porridge.

“Ahhh, this porridge is just right,” she said happily and she ate it all up.

After she’d eaten the three bears’ breakfasts she decided she was feeling a little tired.  So, she walked into the living room where she saw three chairs.  Goldilocks sat in the first chair to rest her feet.

“This chair is too big!” she exclaimed.

So she sat in the second chair.

“This chair is too big, too!”  she whined.

So she tried the last and smallest chair.

“Ahhh, this chair is just right,” she sighed.  But just as she settled down into the chair to rest, it broke into pieces!

Goldilocks was very tired by this time, so she went upstairs to the bedroom.  She lay down in the first bed, but it was too hard.  Then she lay in the second bed, but it was too soft.  Then she lay down in the third bed and it was just right.  Goldilocks fell asleep.

As she was sleeping, the three bears came home.

“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” growled the Papa bear.

“Someone’s been eating my porridge,” said the Mama bear.

“Someone’s been eating my porridge and they ate it all up!” cried the Baby bear.

“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” growled the Papa bear.

“Someone’s been sitting in my chair,” said the Mama bear.

“Someone’s been sitting in my chair and they’ve broken it all to pieces,” cried the Baby bear.

They decided to look around some more and when they got upstairs to the bedroom, Papa bear growled, “Someone’s been sleeping in my bed,”

“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed, too” said the Mama bear

“Someone’s been sleeping in my bed and she’s still there!” exclaimed Baby bear.

Just then, Goldilocks woke up and saw the three bears.  She screamed, “Help!”  And she jumped up and ran out of the room.  Goldilocks ran down the stairs, opened the door, and ran away into the forest.  And she never returned to the home of the three bears.

Jack and the Beanstalk
Jack and the Beanstalk

Once upon a time, there lived a widow woman and her son, Jack, on their small farm in the country.

Every day, Jack would help his mother with the chores , chopping the wood, weeding the garden and milking the cow.  But despite all their hard work, Jack and his mother were very poor with barely enough money to keep themselves fed.

“What shall we do, what shall we do?” said the widow, one spring day.  We don’t have enough money to buy seed for the farm this year!  We must sell our cow, Old Bess, and with the money buy enough seed to plant a good crop.

“All right, mother,” said Jack, “it’s market-day today.  I’ll go into town and sell Bessy.”

So Jack took the cow’s halter in his hand, walked through the garden gate and headed off toward town.  He hadn’t gone far when he met a funny-looking, old man who said to him, “Good morning, Jack.”

“Good morning to you,” said Jack, wondering how the little, old man knew his name.

“Where are you off to this fine morning?” asked the man.

“I’m going to market to sell our cow, Bessy.”

Well what a helpful son you are! exclaimed the man, I have a special deal for such a good boy like you.

The little, old man looked around to make sure no one was watching and then opened his hand to show Jack what he held.

Beans? asked Jack, looking a little confused.

Three magical bean seeds to be exact, young man.  One, two, three!  So magical are they, that if you plant them over-night, by morning they grow right up to the sky, promised the funny little man.  And because you’re such a good boy, they’re all yours in trade for that old milking cow.

“Really?” said Jack, “and you’re quite sure they’re magical?”

“I am indeed!  And if it doesn’t turn out to be true you can have your cow back.”

“Well that sounds fair,” said Jack, as he handed over Bessys halter, pocketed the beans and headed back home to show his mother.

“Back already, Jack?” asked his mother; “I see you haven’t got Old Bess — you’ve sold her so quickly.  How much did you get for her?”

Jack smiled and reached into his pocket, “Just look at these beans, mother; they’re magical, plant them over-night and—-“

“What!” cried Jack’s mother.  “Oh, silly boy!  How could you give away our milking cow for three measly beans.  And with that she did the worst thing Jack had ever seen her do  she burst into tears.

Jack ran upstairs to his little room in the attic, so sorry he was, and threw the beans angrily out the window thinking, How could I have been so foolish  I’ve broken my mother’s heart. After much tossing and turning, at last Jack dropped off to sleep.

When Jack woke up the next morning, his room looked strange.  The sun was shining into part of it like it normally did, and yet all the rest was quite dark and shady.  So Jack jumped up and dressed himself and went to the window.  And what do you think he saw?  Why, the beans he had thrown out of the window into the garden had sprung up into a big beanstalk which went up and up and up until it reached the sky.

Using the leaves and twisty vines like the rungs of a ladder, Jack climbed and climbed until at last, he reached the sky.  And when he got there he found a long, broad road winding its way through the clouds to a tall, square castle off in the distance.

Jack ran up the road toward the castle and just as he reached it, the door swung open to reveal a horrible lady giant, with one great eye in the middle of her forehead.

As soon as Jack saw her he turned to run away, but she caught him, and dragged him into the castle.

“Don’t be in such a hurry, I’m sure a growing boy like you would like a nice, big breakfast,” said the great, big, tall woman, “It’s been so long since I got to make breakfast for a boy.

Well, the lady giant wasn’t such a bad sort, after all — even if she was a bit odd.  She took Jack into the kitchen, and gave him a chunk of cheese and a glass of milk.  But Jack had only taken a few bites when thump! thump! thump! the whole house began to tremble with the noise of someone coming.

“Goodness gracious me!  It’s my husband,” said the giant woman, wringing her hands, “what on earth shall I do?  There’s nothing he likes better than boys broiled on toast and I haven’t any bread left.  Oh dear, I never should have let you stay for breakfast.  Here, come quick and jump in here.”  And she hurried Jack into a large copper pot sitting beside the stove just as her husband, the giant, came in.

He ducked inside the kitchen and said, “I’m ready for my breakfast — I’m so hungry I could eat three cows.  Ah, what’s this I smell?

I smell the blood of an Englishman,
Be he alive, or be he dead
I’ll have his bones to grind my bread.

“Nonsense, dear,” said his wife, “we haven’t had a boy for breakfast in years.  Now you go and wash up and by the time you come back your breakfast’ll be ready for you.”

So the giant went off to tidy up — Jack was about to make a run for it when the woman stopped him.  “Wait until he’s asleep,” she said, “he always has a little snooze after breakfast.”

Jack peeked out of the copper pot just as the giant returned to the kitchen carrying a basket filled with golden eggs and a sickly-looking, white hen.  The giant poked the hen and growled, Lay and the hen laid an egg made of gold which the giant added to the basket.

After his breakfast, the giant went to the closet and pulled out a golden harp with the face of a sad, young girl.  The giant poked the harp and growled, Play and the harp began to play a gentle tune while her lovely face sang a lullaby.  Then the giant began to nod his head and to snore until the house shook.

When he was quite sure the giant was asleep, Jack crept out of the copper pot and began to tiptoe out of the kitchen.  Just as he was about to leave, he heard the sound of the harp-girl weeping.  Jack bit his lip, sighed and returned to the kitchen.  He grabbed the sickly hen and the singing harp, and began to tiptoe back out.  But this time the hen gave a cackle which woke the giant, and just as Jack got out of the house he heard him calling, “Wife, wife, what have you done with my white hen and my golden harp?”

Jack ran as fast as he could and the giant, realizing he had been tricked, came rushing after  away from the castle and down the broad, winding road.  When he got to the beanstalk the giant was only twenty yards away when suddenly he saw Jack disappear  confused, the giant peered through the clouds and saw Jack underneath climbing down for dear life.  The giant stomped his foot and roared angrily.

I smell the blood of an Englishman,
Be he alive, or be he dead
I’ll have his bones to grind my bread.

The giant swung himself down onto the beanstalk which shook with his weight.  Jack slipped, slid and climbed down the beanstalk as quickly as he could, and after him climbed the giant.

As he neared the bottom, Jack called out, “Mother! Please! Hurry, bring me an axe, bring me an axe.”  And his mother came rushing out with Jack’s wood chopping axe in her hand, but when she came to the enormous beanstalk she stood stock still with fright.

Jack jumped down, got hold of the axe and began to chop away at the beanstalk.  Luckily, because of all the chores he done over the years, hed become quite good at chopping and it didn’t take long for him to chop through enough of the beanstalk that it began to teeter.  The giant felt the beanstalk shake and quiver so he stopped to see what was the matter.  Then Jack gave one last big chop with the axe, and the beanstalk began to topple over.  Then the giant fell down and broke his crown, and the beanstalk came toppling after.

The singing harp thanked Jack for rescuing her from the giant  she had hated being locked up in the closet all day and night and wanted nothing more than to sit in the farmhouse window and sing to the birds and the butterflies in the sunshine.

With a bit of patience and his mother’s help, it didn’t take long for Jack to get the sickly hen back in good health and the grateful hen continued to lay a fresh golden egg every day.

Jack used the money from selling the golden eggs to buy back Old Bess, purchase seed for the spring crop and to fix up his mother’s farm.  He even had enough left over to invite every one of his neighbours over for a nice meal, complete with music from the singing harp.

And so Jack, his mother, Old Bess, the golden harp and the white hen lived happy ever after.

Semoga bermanfaat untuk sahabat KBI semua ya 🙂 Good Luck!

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